Interesting things I've bookmarked (old posts, page 24)

IP address exhaustion and the end of the open net

The net, Geoff said, is based on two "accidental technologies": Unix and packet switching. Both were new at their time, and both benefited from open-source reference implementations. That openness created a network which was accessible, neutral, extensible, and commercially exploitable. [Geoff Huston] As a result, proprietary protocols and systems died, and we now have a "networking monoculture" where TCP/IP dominates everything. Openness was the key: IPv4 was as mediocre as any other networking technology at that time. It won not through technical superiority, but because it was open.

UAV to Monitor Fires

Melbourne's Metropolitan Fire Brigade has announced that it's going to deploy an Australian-developed "eye in the sky" remotely-controlled aerial camera from WA-based developer Cyber Technology.Two four-fan CyberQuad UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles) will be used to hover above fires to identify hotspots and send realtime vision to a control centre. One will be fitted with a high-definition camera, while the other will carry a standard definition camera and a thermal imaging camera.

Birds and Quantum Entanglement

European robins can maintain quantum entanglement in their eyes a full 20 microseconds longer than the best laboratory systems, say physicists investigating how birds may use quantum effects to "see" Earth's magnetic field.The quantum compass mechanism hasn't been conclusively demonstrated, but multiple lines of research point towards its existence. Findings like this one underscore its apparently extraordinary sophistication."How can a living system have evolved to protect a quantum state as well - no, better - than we can do in the lab with these exotic molecules?" said quantum physicist Simon Benjamin of the University of Oxford and the National University of Singapore, a co-author of the new study. "That really is an amazing thing.

What is Happening in Egypt

Inspired by the recent protests that led to the fall of the Tunisian government and the ousting of longtime Tunisian dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, Egyptians have joined other protesters across the Arab world (in Algeria, notably) in protesting their autocratic governments, high levels of corruption, and grinding poverty. In Egypt, tens of thousands of protesters have taken to the streets. Here's a photo of one of the protests in Cairo, the capital

WinPhone7 jailbreakers rewarded

To be a jailbreaker means different things depending on the device that you're busy hacking preinstalled walls from. If you're fiddling with consoles, a legal team would come highly recommended, but if you're tweaking mobile code, at least Windows Phone mobile code, you're in for a much sweeter ride. The ChevronWP7 guys that brought us the first jailbreak of Microsoft's Windows Phone 7 are currently in Redmond having a sitdown and a frank exchange of views with WP7 dev experience director Brandon Watson, and the amicable nature of their discourse has been evidenced by the image above. Microsoft is clearly taking a light-hearted and community-friendly approach to handling the (now inevitable) efforts at disabling limitations to its software and we can only congratulate its mobile team for doing so.

Angry Birds and the Evolution of Man

To play Angry Birds, you must use a catapult to lob little birds at structures in the hope of knocking them down on pigs. It's the verb "lob" that intrigues me. There is something much more satisfactory about an object tracing a parabolic ballistic trajectory through space towards its target than either following a straight line or propelling itself.Predicting parabolas is something humans just seem to find intriguing. How else do you explain golf? Or the awe in which we hold good quarterbacks in football and good spin bowlers in cricket? Our bodies are uniquely good at throwing things at targets. The trajectory must be prefigured in the brain before the projectile leaves the fingers. Our shoulders rotate, our scapulas slide, our pelvises pivot, our arms flex and our fingers extend.

Superheroes Home Cities

As if the fictional worlds from comic books and sci-fi flicks weren't already on most geek's destination wish lists, Justin Van Genderen's new travel posters show off pulp cities like Gotham and Metropolis."If superheroes really existed in this world we might see a poster like these in some old travel agency, all tattered hanging on the wall," Van Genderen said in an e-mail interview with Wired.com