Interesting things I've bookmarked (old posts, page 55)

18 One Pan Breakfast Recipes

These 18 eggy, cheesy and sometimes meaty bread puddings stir together all of the usual breakfast table suspects into one stress-free casserole. (Of course, we scoured the Internet to uncover a couple just-as-delicious options for special diets.) And since each can easily be made ahead of time, they also make for the most hassle-free AM entertaining EVER. Get ready for some mouth-watering goodness ahead.

18 One Pan Breakfast Recipes

iRobot Create 2

From beginner programmers to advanced robotics students, Create 2 allows for a variety of programming methods. Use it connected to your laptop, with a microcontroller or come up with your own solutions. You can also go beyond programming and build on to your robot, attaching sensors, electronics, grippers and other cool things.

iRobot Create 2

Rome Reborn

Rome Reborn is an international initiative whose goal is the creation of 3D digital models illustrating the urban development of ancient Rome from the first settlement in the late Bronze Age (ca. 1000 B.C.) to the depopulation of the city in the early Middle Ages (ca. A.D. 550). With the advice of an international Scientific Advisory Committee, the leaders of the project decided that A.D. 320 was the best moment in time to begin the work of modeling. At that time, Rome had reached the peak of its population, and major Christian churches were just beginning to be built. After this date, few new civic buildings were built. Much of what survives of the ancient city dates to this period, making reconstruction less speculative than it must, perforce, be for earlier phases. But having started with A.D. 320, the Rome Reborn team intends to move both backwards and forwards in time until the entire span of time foreseen by our mission has been covered.

The Shape of Rome

We all know the long, rich history of the Roman people, and the city's importance as the center of an empire, and thereafter as the center of the memory of that empire, whose echo, long after its end, still so defines Western concepts of power, authority and peace. What I intend to discuss instead is the geographic city, and how its shape and layers grew gradually and constantly, shaped by famous events, but also by the centuries you won't hear much about in a traditional history of the city. The different parts of Rome's past left their fingerprints on the city's shape in far more direct ways than one tends to realize, even from visiting and walking through the city. Rome's past shows not only in her monuments and ruins, but in the very layout of the streets themselves. Going age by age, I will attempt to show how the city's history and structure are one and the same, and how this real ancient city shows her past in a far more organic and structural way than what we tend invent when we concoct fictitious ancient capitals to populate fantasy worlds or imagined futures.

The Shape of Rome

A Rare Peek Into The Massive Scale of AWS

Like many hyperscale datacenter operators, Amazon started out buying servers from the big tier one server makers, and eventually became the top buyer of machines from Rackable Systems (now part of SGI). But over time, like Google, Facebook, Baidu, and its peers, the company decided to engineer its own systems to tune them precisely for its own workloads and, importantly, to mesh hand-in-glove with its datacenters and their power and cooling systems. The datacenters have evolved over time, and the systems have along with them in lockstep.In the past, Amazon has wanted to hint at the scale of its infrastructure without being terribly specific, and so they came up with this metric. Every day, AWS installs enough server infrastructure to host the entire Amazon e-tailing business from back in 2004, when Amazon the retailer was one-tenth its current size at $7 billion in annual revenue.

A Rare Peek Into The Massive Scale of AWS

Fastest Man on Earth

Sitting alone atop the Sonic Wind, Stapp looked like a pathetic figure. A siren wailed eerily, adding to the tension, and two red flares lofted skywards. Overhead, pilot Joe Kittinger, approaching in a T-33, pushed his throttle wide open in anticipation of the launch. With five seconds to go Stapp yanked a lanyard activating the sled's movie cameras, and hunkered down for the inevitable shock. The Sonic Wind's nine rockets detonated with a terrific roar, spewing 35-foot long trails of fire and hurtling Stapp down the track. "He was going like a bullet," Kittinger remembers. "He went by me like I was standing still, and I was going 350 mph." Just seconds into the run the sled had reached its peak velocity of 632 miles per hour -- actually faster than a bullet -- subjecting Stapp to 20 Gs of force and battering him with wind pressures near two tons. "I thought," continues Kittinger, "that sled is going so damn fast the first bounce is going to be Albuquerque. I mean, there was no way on God's earth that sled could stop at the end of the track. No way." But then, just as the sound of the rockets' initial firing reached the ears of far off observers, the Wind hit the water brake. The rear of the sled, its rockets expended, tore away. The front section continued downrange for several hundred feet, hardly slowing at all until it hit the second water brake."

Fastest Man on Earth

The First Spacewalk

Alexei Leonov did not feel as if he was in motion as he clambered on to the outside of the spacecraft, 500km above the Earth.But in reality, he was hurtling around our planet at speeds that are many times faster than a jet aircraft.The vast, vivid geography of our planet stretched out before him - a giant canvas of contrasting colours and textures.He was the first of his species to see our planet in such glorious aspect.