Posts about geeky

Google Infrastructure Security Design Overview

This document gives an overview of how security is designed into Google’s technical infrastructure. This global scale infrastructure is designed to provide security through the entire information processing lifecycle at Google. This infrastructure provides secure deployment of services, secure storage of data with end user privacy safeguards, secure communications between services, secure and private communication with customers over the internet, and safe operation by administrators.





Wmail

WMail was created to make your webmail feel right at home on your laptop or computer. It keeps the best of Gmail and Google Inbox whilst adding all those extra bits that you miss when using them in a web browser

Wmail

The Cyber Swiss Army Knife

CyberChef is a simple, intuitive web app for carrying out all manner of "cyber" operations within a web browser. These operations include creating hexdumps, simple encoding like XOR or Base64, more complex encryption like AES, DES and Blowfish, data compression and decompression, calculating hashes and checksums, IPv6 and X.509 parsing, and much more.

The tool is designed to enable both technical and non-technical analysts to manipulate data in complex ways without having to deal with complex tools or algorithms.


Big Hex Machine - University of Bristol

The 'Big Hex Machine' is a giant, yet simple, 16-bit computer specifically designed to explain how a computer works. Its instruction set requires a very small compiler, but it is powerful enough to implement useful programs.

The giant machine, based in the Merchant Venturers School of Engineering, measures over eight square meters. It is built out of over 100 specially designed four-bit circuit boards, which enables students to be taught about fundamental principles of computer architecture from just a few basic components.

It was designed, and built, by students and staff at the University of Bristol's Computer Science Department.

Big Hex Machine - University of Bristol


2016 Guide to User Data Security

There's no industry, no organization and no classification of software that is immune to the predatory antics of hackers. Personal information, corporate data, even high-profile social media accounts are under constant attack. Any server system accessible from the Internet is not just a potential target, but an actual target. When Microsoft first starting working on their Windows 2000 software system they wanted to see how well it would resist attack. To test this, they put a few servers onto the network and waited. Within hours the attacks began. We conducted the same experiment in 2016 and it took less than 60 minutes for the first brute force attack to come in from overseas.


Primer for Securing Ubuntu

My First 5 Minutes on a Server, by Bryan Kennedy, is an excellent intro into securing a server against most attacks. We have a few modifications to his approach that we wanted to document as part of our efforts of externalizing our processes and best practices. We also wanted to spend a bit more time explaining a few things that younger engineers may benefit from.