Posts about geeky (old posts, page 4)

A Decade of Apple Advancement

It's amazing to see how things change in a little more than a decade. Back then, Steve Jobs preached the new iMac as the centre of your digital life, the internet machine. Now, the internet machine fits in your pocket.But with 16 times the memory, eight times the storage and more than double its raw computational power, all in just a tiny fraction of the iMac's size and at almost half the price, it truly boggles the mind. Back then, if you told this to anyone, they would have thought you were nuttier than Mel Gibson on speed.It's even more amazing to see how this tiny little thing has dwarfed the Mac. In 2009, Apple sold 10 million Macs - including the desktop and portables - compared to a whopping 45 million iPhones. And the 45 million is not counting the other iOS devices. Next year, the iPad alone is expected to surpass the sales of all Mac computers combined.

why Intel acquired McAfee

But why McAfee? Intel is a chipmaker, not a "scare 'em then sell 'em" security-software outfit. Otellini's answer was architectural. "We have concluded that security has now become the third pillar of computing," he told his listeners, "joining energy-efficient performance and Internet conductivity in importance."And that third pillar, Otellini believes, will be best implemented in silicon, not software. "We believe that security will be most effective when enabled in hardware," he said. "Joining the assets of McAfee with Intel will accelerate and enhance the combination of hardware and software solutions."Intel's head of software and services Renee James cast the acquisition of the software giant as business as usual. "The proposed acquisition of McAfee executes against Intel's software strategy to grow our business by using software to enhance hardware," she assured her audience. "We've done this successfully with over a dozen software acquisitions, including Wind River and Havok.

Owning Virtual Worlds For Fun and Profit | threatpost

Second Life is a virtual world with many million participants created by Linden Labs. Your digital representation in this world is called an avatar. You can make your avatar wander around, buy houses, design clothes, get married, whatever you like. Think of it as World of Warcraft without the weapons. There are a few interesting features of Second Life that make it interesting from a security perspective. The currency used in the virtual world, Linden dollars, can be exchanged for real currency in a fully supported way. The exchange rate is something on the order of 270 L$ for 1 USD$. Therefore, if you could exploit another player's client, you could potentially cash out their Linden dollars for real money.

The Tragic Death of Practically Everything

For years, once-vibrant technologies, products, and companies have been dropping like teenagers in a Freddy Krueger movie. Thank heavens that tech journalists have done such a good job of documenting the carnage as it happened. Without their diligent reporting, we might not be aware that the industry is pretty much an unrelenting bloodbath.

What Happened to Yahoo

When Paul Graham went to work for Yahoo after they bought hid startup in 1998, it felt like the center of the world. It was supposed to be the next big thing. It was supposed to be what Google turned out to be.What went wrong? The problems that hosed Yahoo go back a long time, practically to the beginning of the company. They were already very visible in 1998. Yahoo had two problems Google didn't: easy money, and ambivalence about being a technology company.

Japan's low-tech belly

One government poll shows that although 44% of Japanese use the internet at least once or twice a month, the rest responded that they use it "hardly at all" or "not at all".Considering Japan's top heavy society of over 50s, many of whom have not got to grips with the internet, and who make up 30% of the population and that figure begins to make sense.

The RIAA Are Idiots

The RIAA paid Holmes Roberts & Owen $9,364,901 in 2008, Jenner & Block more than $7,000,000, and Cravath Swain & Moore $1.25 million, to pursue its "copyright infringement" claims, in order to recover a mere $391,000. [ps there were many other law firms feeding at the trough too; these were just the ones listed among the top 5 independent contractors.]

internet filter on backburner

The Federal Government has deferred the introduction of its mandatory internet filtering program.Communications Minister Senator Stephen Conroy says the filter will not be put in place until an independent review can be carried out into what content would be banned.He says the review is likely to take about a year, but leading internet service providers have agreed to block websites known to contain child pornography in the meantime.Senator Conroy says Telstra, Optus and Primus have all agreed to the move."I applaud these industry members for taking this stance, for stepping up to the plate, in recognition that there is some content that is not acceptable in a civil society," he said.