Posts about interesting (old posts, page 18)

Turn Detroit into Drone Valley

But policymakers shouldn't be trying to copy Silicon Valley. Instead, they should be figuring out what domain is (or could be) specific to their region-and then removing the regulatory hurdles for that particular domain. Because we don't want 50 Silicon Valleys; we want 50 different variations of Silicon Valley, all unique from each other and all focusing on different domains. Imagine a Bitcoin Valley, for instance, where some country fully legalizes cryptocurrencies for all financial functions. Or a Drone Valley, where a particular region removes all legal barriers to flying unmanned aerial vehicles locally. A Driverless Car Valley in a city that allows experimentation with different autonomous car designs, redesigned roadways and safety laws. A Stem Cell Valley. And so on.

Turn Detroit into Drone Valley

The Queen shows us who isn't boss

As she processes through the Princes' Chamber in the House of Lords, there are two statues representing mercy and justice placed there on purpose to focus her mind as she prepares to deliver her speech. The route is dotted with pictures and statues of previous monarchs, as if Westminster were saying: "We have seen your like before."And here is the really cheeky move: parliament forces Her Majesty to consider her own mortality as she gets dressed for the occasion. For in the Robing Room of the House of Lords, where the Queen puts on her robe and imperial state crown, the authorities have chosen to display a facsimile of the death warrant of her ancestor, Charles I.

The Queen shows us who isn't boss

Data Analysis Learning Path

The Data Analysis learning path provides a short but intensive introduction to the field of data analysis. The path is divided into three parts. In part 1, we learn general programming practices (software design, version control) and tools (python, sql, unix, and Git). In part 2, we learn R and focus more narrowly on data analysis, studying statistical techniques, machine learning, and presentation of findings. Part 3 includes a choice of elective topics: visualization, social network analysis, and big data (Hadoop and MapReduce). Choose from any or all of them to enrich your understanding and skills. "

Data Analysis Learning Path

Marc Andreessen tweet essays

After a 5 year hiatus, acclaimed a16z investor and netscape founder Marc Andreessen returned to twitter (@pmarca) in '14 to give his point of view on the topics of entrepreneurship, investing, politics, and economics. Unfortunately spread over multiple tweets, known as tweetstorms, which are hard to follow using the default twitter timeline. Luckily recently Marc started to use the 'reply to' feature, which allows my algorithm to group the tweets together to improve readability.

The Trade of the Century

In 1992, George Soros brought the Bank of England to its knees. In the process, he pocketed over a billion dollars. Making a billion dollars is by all accounts pretty cool. But demolishing the monetary system of Great Britain in a single day with an elegantly constructed bet against its currency? That's the stuff of legends.Though just two decades ago, Soros made his nation-shaking bet in a very different time. Back then, hedge funds hadn't yet entered the public consciousness, restrictions on capital flowing from one country to another were just lifted, and the era of the 24 hours a day news cycle had just begun. To appreciate how Soros made a fortune betting against the British pound requires some knowledge of how exchange rates between countries work, the macroeconomic tools governments use to stimulate economies, and how hedge funds make money

The Trade of the Century

What's So Scary About Smart Girls?

That means that curbing birthrates tends to lead to stability, and that's where educating girls comes in. You educate a boy, and he'll have fewer children, but it's a small effect. You educate a girl, and, on average, she will have a significantly smaller family. One robust Nigeria study managed to tease out correlation from causation and found that for each additional year of primary school, a girl has 0.26 fewer children. So if we want to reduce the youth bulge a decade from now, educate girls today.

What's So Scary About Smart Girls?

Russell Brand was right, what now?

That does not mean the solution lies within the prevailing political paradigm. Brand's call for revolution, for a fundamental political, economic, cultural and cognitive shift, is on point. But rather than entailing disengagement resulting in anarchy, this requires the opposite: Engagement at all levels in order to elicit structural transformation on multiple scales through the overwhelming presence of people taking power back, here and now.That could include civil disobedience and occupying public spaces. But it should also include occupying mainstream political spaces - not just as an act of protest, but as an act of constructive engagement that is difficult to ignore, through intensive, organised grassroots campaigning, lobbying and dialogue with political actors; occupying media narratives by mobilising organised critical engagement with journalists and editors; occupying economic spaces by experimenting with new equitable forms of production, consumption and exchange; occupying food and energy spaces by pooling community resources to grow our own food and produce our own energy in our communities; and so on.

A Legendary Photo Gives Up Its Secrets

Part detective story, part homage to the American immigrant experience and, ultimately, a tribute to the simple dignity of hard work, the documentary film Men at Lunch examines the mysteries behind one of the most recognizable images of the 20th century: eleven men casually perched atop a steel beam hundreds of feet above Manhattan. For eight decades, from the time the photo was made in 1932 until brothers Sean and Eamonn O Cualain came across a print of the photo in a pub in the west of Ireland in 2009, the picture was embraced as a stirring illustration of the creation of modern New York. Here, the picture seems to say, are the immigrants who built, by hand, the greatest skyline in the world. Here are the unsung heroes of Manhattan.

A Legendary Photo Gives Up Its Secrets

Movement Evolution

How will robots of the future get around? Some say tank treads. Some say legs and feet. But nobody knows for sure, and that's why researchers at Cornell University designed a computer program to figure it out. The software simulates evolution. Robots begin as blocks of muscle, tissue, and bone, then natural selection kicks in: The fastest bots in each generation have offspring and are more likely to move on to the next round. The slower ones die out. Here are five of the most memorable variations from 175,000 generations.

A Gear Discovered in Nature

As the legs unfurl to power the jump," Burrows says, "both have to move at exactly the same time. If they didn't, the animal would start to spiral out of control." Larger animals, whether kangaroos or NBA players, rely on their nervous system to keep their legs in sync when pushing off to jump--using a constant loop of adjustment and feedback. But for the issus, their legs outpace their nervous system. By the time the insect has sent a signal from its legs to its brain and back again, roughly 5 or 6 milliseconds, the launch has long since happened. Instead, the gears, which engage before the jump, let the issus lock its legs together--synchronizing their movements to a precision of 1/300,000 of a second.

A Gear Discovered in Nature