Hi, I'm Fuzzy.

This site, Fuzzy's Logic, is a dumping ground for things I find interesting. If you're looking for content I've personally generated you might want to head directly to one of my other sites:

Hi, I'm Fuzzy.

How To Become A Hacker

There is a community, a shared culture, of expert programmers and networking wizards that traces its history back through decades to the first time-sharing minicomputers and the earliest ARPAnet experiments. The members of this culture originated the term 'hacker'. Hackers built the Internet. Hackers made the Unix operating system what it is today. Hackers run Usenet. Hackers make the World Wide Web work. If you are part of this culture, if you have contributed to it and other people in it know who you are and call you a hacker, you're a hacker. The hacker mind-set is not confined to this software-hacker culture. There are people who apply the hacker attitude to other things, like electronics or music -- actually, you can find it at the highest levels of any science or art. Software hackers recognize these kindred spirits elsewhere and may call them 'hackers' too -- and some claim that the hacker nature is really independent of the particular medium the hacker works in. But in the rest of this document we will focus on the skills and attitudes of software hackers, and the traditions of the shared culture that originated the term 'hacker'. There is another group of people who loudly call themselves hackers, but aren't. These are people (mainly adolescent males) who get a kick out of breaking into computers and phreaking the phone system. Real hackers call these people 'crackers' and want nothing to do with them. Real hackers mostly think crackers are lazy, irresponsible, and not very bright, and object that being able to break security doesn't make you a hacker any more than being able to hotwire cars makes you an automotive engineer. Unfortunately, many journalists and writers have been fooled into using the word 'hacker' to describe crackers; this irritates real hackers no end.

The Biggest Scientific Breakthroughs of 2012

This was an incredible year for science and engineering. We sent a powerful robot scientist to Mars, and we discovered the elusive Higgs Boson particle, plus there were world-changing innovations in medicine and materials science. We sequenced the genome of a human ancestor, and looked into the mind of an artificial intelligence that recognized the content of images on the web for the first time (of course it included cat faces). Here are the seventeen biggest scientific breakthroughs of 2012.

Understanding Pac-Man Ghost Behavior

The key to understanding ghost behavior is the concept of a target tile. The large majority of the time, each ghost has a specific tile that it is trying to reach, and its behavior revolves around trying to get to that tile from its current one. All of the ghosts use identical methods to travel towards their targets, but the different ghost personalities come about due to the individual way each ghost has of selecting its target tile. Note that there are no restrictions that a target tile must actually be possible to reach, they can (and often are) located on an inaccessible tile, and many of the common ghost behaviors are a direct result of this possibility.

Understanding Pac-Man Ghost Behavior

Eight Quotes from 2012 that will Redefine Our Future

When is the last time you heard a statement that caused you to stop dead in your tracks? It doesn't happen very often, but for each of us, there are a few unusual sound bites that will permeate our senses and sway our thinking. On these rare occasions, it's usually a statement by someone we trust, with the power, authority, and credibility to make such a declaration. However, inside all of the statements the world finds important are the creme de la creme, the Richter scale shifting assertions that really stand out. These are statements so insightful and memorable that they have the power to change the course of history. For this reason, I wanted to focus on eight shocking statements made in 2012, and discuss briefly how they will invariably shift our outlook on the future. Here are the eight statements we've judged to be trend-setters for 2013 and beyond.

Best astronomy images 2012

The Universe is beautiful.Which is interesting. It doesn't have to be; it could be all colorless and weird and lumpy. Instead, it's bursting with color, sculpted by vast forces, molded into fantastic shapes that please our eyes and delight our brains--especially once we understand what we're seeing.Every December I pick my favorite images from the previous year to display, a task that is extraordinarily difficult. I always wind up with a list of about 60 or 70, and I have to cull it down mercilessly. Such is the case this year again, and I could pare it only to 21, a score and more of gorgeousness for you to soak in. I choose the pictures not just for their beauty but also because they are interesting, and different--ones that stand out from the crowd somehow. I usually put them in order with my favorite one last, but this year I just can't. I'll let you know my favorite when you get to it--I expect you'll agree--but other than that it's just a dead tie.

Google Zeitgeist 2012

Google studied an aggregation of over one trillion searches (or queries) that people typed into Google Search this year. We used data from multiple sources, including Google Trends and internal data tools. We filtered out spam and repeat queries to build lists that best reflect the spirit of 2012.The "trending" queries are the searches that had the highest amount of traffic over a sustained period in 2012 as compared to 2011.