Hi, I'm Fuzzy.

This site, Fuzzy's Logic, is a dumping ground for things I find interesting. If you're looking for content I've personally generated you might want to head directly to one of my other sites:

Hi, I'm Fuzzy.

How Ingenuity Destroyed Salad Bars

In China, Pizza Huts are either take-out only or somewhat upscale sit-down restaurants that even serve steak. A while back, it became a fad of sorts to build enormous fruit and vegetable structures at Pizza Hut salad bars. The reason was that customers only got one plate and one trip to the salad bar, so they wanted their visit to be worth it. And was it ever.

How Ingenuity Destroyed Salad Bars

Mobile Phones

I've posted previously about how I was very late to the smart phone "revolution" and as my experience of living with an Android device in my pocket has continued I thought I'd give a little update.

As quick Too Long; Didn't Read update, here the 5 key reasons I'd continued using an old nokia handset while the waves of the smartphone sea crashed around me:

  1. I'm at a computer for around 12 hours a day.
  2. When not at a computer I actually like being disconnected from email, the web, etc.
  3. Simplicity. I don't waste brain cycles on apps, updating, upgrading, replacing, recharging.
  4. Size. The nokia 6100 I used back home in Australia was the smallest and lightest phone nokia have ever made. It was also practically unbreakable.
  5. Cost.

The change came when my new employer declared that they'd pay all the contract fees of a phone plan, including the upfront cost if it was under $50. Therefore, if I was happy with an older handset it would cost me nothing. If I wanted a new shiny Galaxy S4 or HTC One, I'd have to fork out the $200 upfront cost.

I can report that I've had my 1st taste of the "upgrade cycle", just this week I moved from the HTC Droid Incredible which I had been given by my employer as a temporary phone until I worked out what I wanted for a longer period. The Droid was a good entry point for me, not large enough to annoy me as I carried it around in my pocket.

My plan was to wait until the Galaxy S4 was released and cross my fingers that the S3 would drop down into the $50 upfront bucket. Initially verizon lowered the S3 from $200 to $100. I was disappointed, but I'd got used to the Droid and even though it was running the old version of android I figured I'd just stick with it and keep an eye on the $50 bucket.

The S3 had a special draw for me, beyond being an excellent handset; a barometer. This would allow me to use the BASEline flight computer app to track my skydives.

Color me surprised when on one of my random checks of the verizon page I noticed that the S3 was now $50. I organized to get switched over to the S3 and have been wonderfully surprised. Yes it is bigger in my pocket but it is lighter, which is more important. I'll accept the size increase because the screen is so much better to read from. Android 4 is really quite an improvement and the overall speed increase is huge.

I've also got to admit that I've become extremely addicted to Real Racing 3. I did not expect to find that one of the best racing games ever made would be for a mobile device.... and free.

In other mobile phone news, if I had ~$700 to blow to buy a handset outright, I think I'd be very interested in the Ubuntu Edge. I think they're on the right path and that the end game for mobile devices is that they will become true "convergence" devices which can replace desktop computers for general computing tasks.

Ubuntu Edge

This beautifully crafted smartphone is a proving ground for the most advanced mobile technologies on the horizon, a showpiece for true mobile innovation. And at the heart of it all is convergence: connect to any monitor and this Ubuntu phone transforms into an Ubuntu PC, with a fully integrated desktop OS and shared access to all files. We're fascinated by converged computing, the idea that the smartphone in your pocket can also be the brain of the PC on your desk. We've shaped Ubuntu so you can transition seamlessly between the two environments. Now all that's needed is a phone that's designed from the ground up to be a PC as well. The Ubuntu Edge is our very own superphone, a catalyst to drive the next generation of personal computing.

The screenwriting manual that's killing movies

Summer movies are often described as formulaic. But what few people know is that there is actually a formula--one that lays out, on a page-by-page basis, exactly what should happen when in a screenplay. It's as if a mad scientist has discovered a secret process for making a perfect, or at least perfectly conventional, summer blockbuster.The formula didn't come from a mad scientist. Instead it came from a screenplay guidebook, Save the Cat! The Last Book on Screenwriting You'll Ever Need. In the book, author Blake Snyder, a successful spec screenwriter who became an influential screenplay guru, preaches a variant on the basic three-act structure that has dominated blockbuster filmmaking since the late 1970s.

New 3D Brain Map

First, the brain was scanned using a magnetic resonance scanner then imbedded into paraffin and then cut with a microtome for large sections into more than 7,400 sections," Katrin Amunts of the Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine in Julich, Germany told Sciencemag.org. After sectioning the brain, researchers began the time and labor intensive process of section imaging, cell body staining, digital removal of anomalies and the precise reconstruction of the brain sections to create a final 3D image.

New 3D Brain Map

NSA Admits It Analyzes 2 or 3 Hops

Inglis' admission isn't likely to help the effort to convince members of the House that the surveillance programs should be kept as is. Neither will a response offered by DNI counsel Robert Litt. Asked by committee chairman Bob Goodlatte if the government really thought the massive collection of phone records could be kept from the American people, Litt replied, "Well, um, we tried.

Boston Dynamics Atlas Humanoid Robot

DARPA and Boston Dynamics, of BigDog, Petman, and Cheetah fame, have unveiled their most advanced humanoid robot yet: Atlas. At 6'2'' (188cm) and 330lbs (150kg), Atlas is incredibly imposing; with 28 hydraulically actuated joints, LIDAR and stereo vision, a beefy on-board computer, and some of the most advanced robotic limbs ever conceived, Atlas is remarkably human-like in its behavior. While Atlas is initially conceived as a disaster response robot, such as cleaning up and looking for survivors after a Fukushima-like disaster, it's easy to imagine Atlas being the basis of a robotic army, supported by BigDog mules.

Boston Dynamics Atlas Humanoid Robot

China's Manned Space Program

China's manned space program is now entering its second decade, with ambitious plans including a permanent space station, manned lunar missions, and a possible manned mission to Mars in 2040-2060. Two weeks ago, the Shenzhou-10 spacecraft landed safely with a crew of three in inner Mongolia. The mission was the longest yet for China -- 15 days in orbit, including a successful docking with the Tiangong-1 Space Laboratory, the first module in a planned space station. To date, China has successfully put eight astronauts into orbit in five missions. Chinese authorities are vague about announcing future missions, so no specific launch dates have been announced for Shenzou-11 or Tiangong-2 (2nd module of the Tiangong program space station). gathered here are images of the Shenzhou-10 mission, and several other highlights from the past decade of Chinese manned spaceflight.

China's Manned Space Program

China's Manned Space Program

China's Manned Space Program

China's Manned Space Program